WordCamp Norway 2016

Had a good time at WordCamp Norway listening to talks about WordPress being used for sites like Miljøpartiet De Grønne, Fnugg.no and United Influencers.

Talking to agencies like Dekode, Maksimer and Making Waves, it is good to hear WordPress gaining momentum in Norway and making a shift against proprietary CMS’s like Episerver for the enterprise clients.

WooCommerce powers over a million!

We use BuiltWith to measure WooCommerce growth and compare to our competition. They just updated their entire database which includes 332 million domains, and WooCommerce just passed a million websites (up from 900k). The new number is 1,111,882 sites running WooCommerce which is close to WordPress.org usage stats of 1+ million sites with the plugin installed.

This is pretty amazing for an eCommerce platform which is just over 4 years old, but shows the powers of open source and WordPress.

Internetdagarna in Stockholm

I told the WooThemes story at Internetdagarna in Stockholm.

WordPress now powers 1/4 of the Internet

When we launched WooCommerce back in 2011, WordPress only powered 13,1% of all websites online, but it has almost doubled that since then, and now powers a whopping 25% of all sites on the Internet.

I think open source generally grows stronger and more secure the more popular it is and more people it has working on it. We all benefit from a common platform we can build on and then differentiate on top of it, instead of reinventing the wheel over and over again for no good reason.

You can read more on Matt’s blog.

From Commercial Themes to the Fastest Growing eCommerce Platform – The story of WooThemes

Mark (my co-founder at Woo) spoke at WordCamp Europe on the story of WooThemes. If you are interested in how we grew Woo from 3 to 55 people in just under seven years, and how we were eventually acquired by Automattic, then take a look at the video of the presentation.

What does a8c stand for?

Going through due diligence with Automattic meant learning a lot about the company. One of the amusing things to discover was all the acronyms used, and the first time I saw “a8c” I had no idea what it meant.

Was it a code word for some secret project?

Did everybody else but me know what it meant?

Luckily I’m not the only one who didn’t know of these acronyms, and I’ve since learned about a11n, a12s and even a16z from reading The Hard Things About Hard Things

I’ll be honest and say that I never knew what the hell Il8n meant when reading about translating WordPress into other languages – and probably too lazy to Google it. But now it all clicks!

Consider this a crash course in abbreviations of long words, and know that you aren’t the only one.